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58 Georgia educators earn "Master Teacher" certification

58 Georgia educators earn "Master Teacher" certification

ATLANTA -- Governor Nathan Deal announced on Tuesday that 58 educators of Georgia schools have earned the "Master Teacher" certification. 

The certification is based on how each teacher demonstrated excellence in student achievement and growth across the 2013 academic year, reported a spokesperson from the Governor's office. 

The "Master Teacher" program began in 2005 with the help of the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. A Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) measured classroom performance and academic growth, along with the teachers' professional practice. 

The "Master Teacher" certification lasts seven years, and as long as they qualify, teachers can renew their certificates. 

Kelly Henson, Executive Secretary for the Georgia Professional Standards Commission said, "The 2013 Master Teachers join a group of Georgia's highly skilled and dedicated educators who share a passion for teaching and student learning." 

School district celebrates African-American AP performance

School district celebrates African-American AP performance

FULTON COUNTY, Ga. -- A new report names Fulton County Schools as one of six urban districts nationwide to successfully increase African-American participation and success in Advanced Placement courses.

The report, "The Road to Equity: Expanding AP Access and Success for African-American Students," was created by the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation.

It explains how black students in Fulton County Schools have improved their AP passing rates enough to gain on their white classmates, and how more and more black students have shown interest in taking AP courses.

"This report is eye-opening in how well our schools are doing, but to reach our strategic goal of increased college preparedness, we have to do more to engage all of our minority student populations," Fulton County Schools Superintendent Dr. Robert Avossa said in a statement.

Fulton County Schools see graduation rates on steady rise

Fulton County Schools see graduation rates on steady rise

FULTON COUNTY -- In 2012-2013 school year, the Fulton County School System saw an increase in graduation rates, continued from a 2011 rise. 

In 2011, seniors had a 70.1 percent graduation rate, followed by 71.3 percent for 2013, a spokeswoman for Fulton County Schools reported. Throughout the schools, nine saw the rise in rates. Roswell High School was among the top with a 12-point jump. 

"It's great that 71 percent of our students are successfully finishing high school, but that also means more than a quarter of our students are being left behind," Superintendent Robert Avossa said. "One of our strategic focuses is to increase graduation rates to 90 percent by 2017."

Avossa pointed out that support from parents and the community are key helpers to achieve Fulton County's graduation goal. 

Formula: Graduation rate soars among Georgia high school students

Formula: Graduation rate soars among Georgia high school students

(WXIA) -- The number of students receiving diplomas is on a steady rise, as it jumped for a second time using a new formula.

For 2013, Matt Cardoza of the Georgia Department of Education reported, the graduation rate marked 67.4 percent in 2011, followed by 69.7 percent in 2012.  The new way to figure the graduation rate is based on the adjusted cohort rate, which is required by the U.S. Department of Education. 

The four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate defines the cohort based on when a student becomes a freshman, Cardoza said. The calculation takes the number of students who graduate within four years and includes adjustments for student transfers. 

"I am very pleased that our graduation rate continues to increase, no matter how it is calculated," State School Superintendent Dr. John Barge said. "While our graduation rate is still far too low and we have much progress to be made, we are moving in the right direction."

Fulton Co. Schools makes changes to Continuous Achievement framework

Fulton Co. Schools makes changes to Continuous Achievement framework

ATLANTA -- The Fulton County School System is altering the framework of the Continuous Achievement model, which plays a role in how math and reading material is delivered to students. 

By using Continuous Achievement, students can learn at a level that suits them, allowing for further academic acceleration and achievement. 

The model, according to a spokeswoman for FCS, is ranked for academic placement, and reported twice per semester, starting at 2.1, 2.2, 3.1 as levels move up. That level will also be included in report cards and progress checklists. 

"This is exciting for Fulton County Schools. By promoting innovation, Continuous Achievement is consistent with our vision as a charter system," Superintendent Robert Avossa said. "It really gets to what we're about - customizing students' learning experiences so they can learn to their full potential." 

Fulton County school breakfast programs help kids eat healthy

Fulton County school breakfast programs help kids eat healthy

FULTON COUNTY -- The American Association of School Administration has awarded a grant to Fulton County Schools, in which the funds will help kids eat healthy breakfasts before their school days begin. 

"Breakfast in the Classroom" will be implemented in Mimosa Elementary and Woodland Elementary. By having the program in those schools, students will be provided with a low-cost bagged breakfast from the cafeteria. They can then eat the breakfast in their classrooms before school starts.

Six middle schools will offer "Grab-n-Go' breakfasts along with four high schools. Those schools include Holcomb Bridge, McNair, Paul D. West, Ridgeview, Sandtown and Woodland Middle, along with Creekside, McClarin, Tri-Cities and Westlake High. Similar to "Breakfast in the Classroom," the "Grab-n-Go" program allows students to take a bagged breakfast from the cafeteria and portable kiosks in the school.. They can eat the meals before school.

School is (almost!) out in Fulton County

School is (almost!) out in Fulton County

ATLANTA -- The last day of school is fast approaching in metro Atlanta, with some districts dismissing as early as this week.

For Fulton County Schools, the last day is Thursday, May 23.

Other last days of school in the Atlanta area include:

Thursday, May 16
Barrow County

Friday, May 17
Clarke County

Wednesday, May 22
Atlanta Public Schools (traditional)
Cherokee County
Gwinnett County

Thursday, May 23
Clayton County
Cobb County
Decatur City
DeKalb County
Rockdale County

Friday, May 24
Bartow County
Buford City
Carroll County
Coweta County
Fayette County
Floyd County
Forsyth County
Griffin-Spalding County
Marietta City
Newton County
Paulding County